Sourabh Boruah

BoruahSourabh Boruah
Graduate Research Assistant, PhD Student

    Sourabh was a PhD student at the Center for Applied Biomechanics. He was interested in the study of biomaterials and its application in injury mitigation and the design of bio medical devices. During his time at CAB he was studying the structure and mechanical function of the bones in the human calvarium, particularly in the context of blast exposure. In the past, he had worked towards characterization of the impact response of the bones of the shoulder complex at the Impact Mechanics Laboratory of the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi. In his leisure time, Sourabh can be found engaged in diversification of his culinary experiences.

    Sourabh graduated from UVa in October 2016 after defending his PhD dissertation entitled “A Viscoelastic Model for High Strain Rate Loading of the Human Calvarium.”

 
 

 

Education

  • PhD, Mechanical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA
  • BS, Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, India

 

Research Interests

  • Human body finite element modeling
  • Biological material mechanical characterization
  • Composite bone viscoelasticity
  • Medical image processing

 

Other Interests

  • Cooking

 

CV-Link

 

Selected Publications

  • Variation of bone layer thicknesses and trabecular volume fraction in the adult male human calvarium. Bone. 2015; 77: 120 – 134.
  • A lumped-mass model to simulate through-the-thickness transmission of vibration in the adult human skull. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Biomechanics of Impact. Berlin 2014.
  • Assessment of the bio-fidelity of a test manikin for ejection seat evaluation through matched pair testing. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 2014; 85(3).
  • Response of human skull bone to dynamic compressive loading. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Biomechanics of Impact. Gothenburg 2013.
  • Frequency dependent energy dissipation of stress waves in the human skull. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 2013; 84(4).